Contact Us

If you would like to make an enquiry please use this contact form and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Postal Address

Pear Tree Mead Academy
Pear Tree Mead
Harlow
Essex
CM18 7BY

Telephone: 01279 836181

Head Teacher: Mrs Christine Peden

Chair of Governors: Mrs Wendy Beckett

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from your teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

Ash  Class

Aspen Class .

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Nursery 2020-2021.

 

Some helpful documents…

Readiness for school project LEAFLET 2019 

Readiness for school language project LEAFLET 2019

Readiness for school maths project LEAFLET 2019

Top Tips SRP

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

 

What are we learning?+

We follow The Early Years Foundation Stage Profile, in Nursery. The link below shows a simplistic view of what this means and what we carry out in order for our children to advance and accomplish their full potential. Your child will mostly be taught through games and play.

The areas of learning are:

  • communication and language
  • physical development
  • personal, social and emotional development
  • literacy
  • mathematics
  • understanding the world
  • expressive arts and design

You can view our curriculum newsletters throughout this academic year by clicking on the link below.

 

Curriculum Newsletters  2020 / 2021

Nursery Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Nursery Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

 

 

Please see other links below for more information:

 

 

 

If the Nursery is closed, due to severe weather. Please click on the link below to see some activities you could do to pass the time and enrich learning with your child.

Snow Day for Nursery

 

How can you help?+

What are my child’s needs?

Children come into nursery, with a wide variety of different experiences.  Some have been at nurseries before, whilst for others it it the first time they have ever left their main carer.  Therefore we do not have rigid expectations of children and instead, assess where they are at and work from there.  The Early Years Outcomes guide shows typical behaviours of children at different age levels.  You may find it interesting to have a look at the things children can ‘typically’ do at different ages, and perhaps use this as a basis for what you would like to help your child do next.

Early Years Outcomes

Encouraging your child’s speaking

Good speaking skills enable your child to communicate their needs and wants; explore their ideas with others; and create friendships with their peers.  Speech develops rapidly during the early years, so it is important that as adults we encourage good speech habits.  Here are some ways you can help:

  • Insist on your child “using their words”.  It is natural for young children to show you what they want by pointing, but by making a stand and saying “What do you want?  Use your words” your child will have to practise their speaking.
  • All but one.  Purposefully give your child enverything they need for a task but one thing (e.g. their socks and one shoe, or their knife but no fork).  This will mean that they have to use their voice to describe what they need.  They will also find it funny that you’re trying to trick them.
  • Play dumb.  Even though you can usually guess what your child wants even if they only use one word, pretend that you don’t in order to encourage your child to use a full sentence.  For example, if your child hands you their coat and says “coat”, say “thanks” and pretend to put it on yourself, until they say “No!  Help me put my coat on please”.  This is quite a funny game too!
  • Sing nursery rhymes and songs.  When singing, children practise making different sounds and using rhythm, which both promote good speech development.
  • Remove the dummy.  Dummies can be much needed comforters for babies, but once your child starts to talk they can be very damaging.  With a dummy in, children are unable to touch the roof of their mouth with their tongue, so they get into the habit of making sounds like /d/ and /t/ using the back of their throat.  This habit of gutteral speech can be long-lasting and sometimes needs speech therapy to help fix.
  • Go for a chatty walk.  Walk around your local area with your child, talking all the while about all the different things you see – the lamposts, the cars, the clouds…  Go at your child’s pace and encourage them to take their time exploring things they see.  This will help your child to increase their vocabulary and will also broaden their knowledge of their environment.

 

Learning to get dressed

This is perhaps one of the most important skills your child will develop whilst they are 3 and 4.  In nursery there is a big emphasis on children trying to dress themselves for P.E. as well as putting on their own coats, hats, scarves and gloves.  Getting your child to practise getting dressed at home will not only give them the independence they need for school but will also develop their fine motor skills (e.g. fastening zips and buttons) and gross motor skills (e.g. standing on one leg to put trousers on).  This is very much a case of practise makes perfect, but here are some hints and tips:

  • Don’t throw them in the deep end!  Start by ensuring you child has some easy clothes: elasticated waistbands, velcro shoes and underwear with a logo at the front to help them tell the front from the back.
  • Focus on one item of clothing at a time.  Overloading your child by asking them to do everything unaided straight away can be a bit daunting and may put them off.  Try to give them an achievable task and be sure to praise their efforts.
  • Break the task down into steps.  For example putting on shorts might be: 1. work out the front from back 2. hold the front waistband 3. put the first leg through and touch the floor with your foot 4. put the second leg through 5. pull them up.
  • Give your child time.  When you see your child struggling, lost inside their jumper, it is tempting to jump straight in.  Instead count slowly to 10 before offering help, as this might be just the time they need to work their way out.

 

Messy Play Ideas

The thought of shaving foam on the sofa or paint on the curtains probably fills you with dread, but messy play is an imprtant part of your child’s learning.  Exploring different textures and learning how to manipulate materials is an important part of your child’s artistic development, whilst sensory play also helps your child learn how to use their hands effectively, developing the motor skills needed for eventually learning to write.

It is important that children learn how to keep themselves and the house clean during messy play.  An old plastic mattress protector or under-highchair mat are ideal for protecting your carpets and an old adult’s shirt makes a perfect clothes protector for your child.  It is also important the your child takes an active part in the clean-up process.  It is probably worth collecting some large ice-cream tubs and yoghurt pots to contain your messy creations.

Glittery Water Coloured Water

Add a few drops of food colouring, and perhaps a little glitter, to a bowl of water and tell your child it’s a magic potion.  Give them some spoons, yoghurt pots, a funnel and a sieve and watch their imagination run wild!  Try giving them several different colours of water and allow them to experiment with mixing the different colours and seeing what happens.  Challenge them to guess what colour they are going to make.

 Gloop Gloop

Mix 2 parts cornflour with 1 part water to make a really fun gloop.  It looks slimy and wet but will go hard when squeezed together then run through your fingers when you let go.  Hide some hard beans in the gloop and encourage your child to find them, counting them at the end.

Chalking Chalk

Give your child some chalk and allow them to decorate the patio.  Join in and show off your artistic side or use it as an opportunity to show your child how to write some letters from their name or teach them to recognise some numbers.  Don’t worry, it will wash away with the rain, and if it doesn’t give your child a sponge and a bucket of water and I’m sure they will have fun cleaning it off!

Bubble prinitng Bubbles

Whether you use shop-bought bubble mix or just washing up liquid and water, bubbles are great fun.  Encourage your child to count as they pop bubbles or put on some music and dim the lights to have a bubble-disco!  Add some food-colouring or paint to a washing up bowl full of water and washing-up liquid and froth up the bubbles until they come up beyond the rim of the bowl.  Put some paper against the bubbles to make some bubble prints.  Try mixing different colours to achieve different effects.

Papier mache balloon Papier Mache

Add 1 part flour to 2 parts water to create a glue-like paste.  Rip up bits of paper (most children find this the most fun part!) and dip it into the paste, covering it but not too thick.  Then place the paper on whatever you are making.  A popular option is covering a balloon, and then cutting it in half and cutting eye-holes to make two masks.  Alternatively you could cut out the initial of your child’s name from corrugated cardboard, papier mache and paint it to make a lovely tactile learning resource.  Your could even do all the letters of your child’s name and hang them on a coat hanger to make a mobile for their room.

Internet Websites

There are a wonderful range of websites that can support children’s learning at home, whilst developing their technology skills and having fun. Remember to take photos of your children using the computer, tablet or phone so we can add it to their Learning Journey book or send it to their Tapestry account.

CBeebies

Crickweb

NickJr.

Busy Things  Username: home5826 Passwprd: peartree

Some of the songs we sing during our nursery session are available on You Tube:

The Animal Sounds Song

Jolly Phonics Song

10 Little Numbers

Shapes Song

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from your teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

Ash  Class

Aspen Class .

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Nursery 2020-2021.

 

Some helpful documents…

Readiness for school project LEAFLET 2019 

Readiness for school language project LEAFLET 2019

Readiness for school maths project LEAFLET 2019

Top Tips SRP

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

 

What are we learning?+

We follow The Early Years Foundation Stage Profile, in Nursery. The link below shows a simplistic view of what this means and what we carry out in order for our children to advance and accomplish their full potential. Your child will mostly be taught through games and play.

The areas of learning are:

  • communication and language
  • physical development
  • personal, social and emotional development
  • literacy
  • mathematics
  • understanding the world
  • expressive arts and design

You can view our curriculum newsletters throughout this academic year by clicking on the link below.

 

Curriculum Newsletters  2020 / 2021

Nursery Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Nursery Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

 

 

Please see other links below for more information:

 

 

 

If the Nursery is closed, due to severe weather. Please click on the link below to see some activities you could do to pass the time and enrich learning with your child.

Snow Day for Nursery

 

How can you help?+

What are my child’s needs?

Children come into nursery, with a wide variety of different experiences.  Some have been at nurseries before, whilst for others it it the first time they have ever left their main carer.  Therefore we do not have rigid expectations of children and instead, assess where they are at and work from there.  The Early Years Outcomes guide shows typical behaviours of children at different age levels.  You may find it interesting to have a look at the things children can ‘typically’ do at different ages, and perhaps use this as a basis for what you would like to help your child do next.

Early Years Outcomes

Encouraging your child’s speaking

Good speaking skills enable your child to communicate their needs and wants; explore their ideas with others; and create friendships with their peers.  Speech develops rapidly during the early years, so it is important that as adults we encourage good speech habits.  Here are some ways you can help:

  • Insist on your child “using their words”.  It is natural for young children to show you what they want by pointing, but by making a stand and saying “What do you want?  Use your words” your child will have to practise their speaking.
  • All but one.  Purposefully give your child enverything they need for a task but one thing (e.g. their socks and one shoe, or their knife but no fork).  This will mean that they have to use their voice to describe what they need.  They will also find it funny that you’re trying to trick them.
  • Play dumb.  Even though you can usually guess what your child wants even if they only use one word, pretend that you don’t in order to encourage your child to use a full sentence.  For example, if your child hands you their coat and says “coat”, say “thanks” and pretend to put it on yourself, until they say “No!  Help me put my coat on please”.  This is quite a funny game too!
  • Sing nursery rhymes and songs.  When singing, children practise making different sounds and using rhythm, which both promote good speech development.
  • Remove the dummy.  Dummies can be much needed comforters for babies, but once your child starts to talk they can be very damaging.  With a dummy in, children are unable to touch the roof of their mouth with their tongue, so they get into the habit of making sounds like /d/ and /t/ using the back of their throat.  This habit of gutteral speech can be long-lasting and sometimes needs speech therapy to help fix.
  • Go for a chatty walk.  Walk around your local area with your child, talking all the while about all the different things you see – the lamposts, the cars, the clouds…  Go at your child’s pace and encourage them to take their time exploring things they see.  This will help your child to increase their vocabulary and will also broaden their knowledge of their environment.

 

Learning to get dressed

This is perhaps one of the most important skills your child will develop whilst they are 3 and 4.  In nursery there is a big emphasis on children trying to dress themselves for P.E. as well as putting on their own coats, hats, scarves and gloves.  Getting your child to practise getting dressed at home will not only give them the independence they need for school but will also develop their fine motor skills (e.g. fastening zips and buttons) and gross motor skills (e.g. standing on one leg to put trousers on).  This is very much a case of practise makes perfect, but here are some hints and tips:

  • Don’t throw them in the deep end!  Start by ensuring you child has some easy clothes: elasticated waistbands, velcro shoes and underwear with a logo at the front to help them tell the front from the back.
  • Focus on one item of clothing at a time.  Overloading your child by asking them to do everything unaided straight away can be a bit daunting and may put them off.  Try to give them an achievable task and be sure to praise their efforts.
  • Break the task down into steps.  For example putting on shorts might be: 1. work out the front from back 2. hold the front waistband 3. put the first leg through and touch the floor with your foot 4. put the second leg through 5. pull them up.
  • Give your child time.  When you see your child struggling, lost inside their jumper, it is tempting to jump straight in.  Instead count slowly to 10 before offering help, as this might be just the time they need to work their way out.

 

Messy Play Ideas

The thought of shaving foam on the sofa or paint on the curtains probably fills you with dread, but messy play is an imprtant part of your child’s learning.  Exploring different textures and learning how to manipulate materials is an important part of your child’s artistic development, whilst sensory play also helps your child learn how to use their hands effectively, developing the motor skills needed for eventually learning to write.

It is important that children learn how to keep themselves and the house clean during messy play.  An old plastic mattress protector or under-highchair mat are ideal for protecting your carpets and an old adult’s shirt makes a perfect clothes protector for your child.  It is also important the your child takes an active part in the clean-up process.  It is probably worth collecting some large ice-cream tubs and yoghurt pots to contain your messy creations.

Glittery Water Coloured Water

Add a few drops of food colouring, and perhaps a little glitter, to a bowl of water and tell your child it’s a magic potion.  Give them some spoons, yoghurt pots, a funnel and a sieve and watch their imagination run wild!  Try giving them several different colours of water and allow them to experiment with mixing the different colours and seeing what happens.  Challenge them to guess what colour they are going to make.

 Gloop Gloop

Mix 2 parts cornflour with 1 part water to make a really fun gloop.  It looks slimy and wet but will go hard when squeezed together then run through your fingers when you let go.  Hide some hard beans in the gloop and encourage your child to find them, counting them at the end.

Chalking Chalk

Give your child some chalk and allow them to decorate the patio.  Join in and show off your artistic side or use it as an opportunity to show your child how to write some letters from their name or teach them to recognise some numbers.  Don’t worry, it will wash away with the rain, and if it doesn’t give your child a sponge and a bucket of water and I’m sure they will have fun cleaning it off!

Bubble prinitng Bubbles

Whether you use shop-bought bubble mix or just washing up liquid and water, bubbles are great fun.  Encourage your child to count as they pop bubbles or put on some music and dim the lights to have a bubble-disco!  Add some food-colouring or paint to a washing up bowl full of water and washing-up liquid and froth up the bubbles until they come up beyond the rim of the bowl.  Put some paper against the bubbles to make some bubble prints.  Try mixing different colours to achieve different effects.

Papier mache balloon Papier Mache

Add 1 part flour to 2 parts water to create a glue-like paste.  Rip up bits of paper (most children find this the most fun part!) and dip it into the paste, covering it but not too thick.  Then place the paper on whatever you are making.  A popular option is covering a balloon, and then cutting it in half and cutting eye-holes to make two masks.  Alternatively you could cut out the initial of your child’s name from corrugated cardboard, papier mache and paint it to make a lovely tactile learning resource.  Your could even do all the letters of your child’s name and hang them on a coat hanger to make a mobile for their room.

Internet Websites

There are a wonderful range of websites that can support children’s learning at home, whilst developing their technology skills and having fun. Remember to take photos of your children using the computer, tablet or phone so we can add it to their Learning Journey book or send it to their Tapestry account.

CBeebies

Crickweb

NickJr.

Busy Things  Username: home5826 Passwprd: peartree

Some of the songs we sing during our nursery session are available on You Tube:

The Animal Sounds Song

Jolly Phonics Song

10 Little Numbers

Shapes Song

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

Beech Class

Cedar Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Reception 2020-2021

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

 

What are we learning?+

When you enter this classroom,
You are a scientist,
You are an explorer,
You are a reader,
You are a mathematician,
You are important,
You are loved,
You are a friend,
You are the REASON we’re here.

In Reception we follow The Early Years Foundation Stage Profile. The link below shows a simplistic view of what this means and what we carry out in order for our children to progress further and achieve their full potential!

 

Curriculum

Reception Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Reception Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

What is the Early Years Foundation Stage? 

 

Snow Day Activities

If for any reason our teachers and other members of staff is unable to get to Oak and Willow class due to severe weather. Please click on the link below to see what is in store for the children on what activities they will be doing.

Snow Day Activities Itinerary

How can you help?+

Communication and Language

Communicating seems to be an in-built drive- and the ways we communicate rely as much on non-verbal means as on spoken communication. Communication and language is split into three sections: Listening and Attention, Understanding and Speaking.

Here are some ideas to help deveop your children’s communication and languague:

  • Sing and teach them different songs and rhymes, particularly focusing on alliteration (when each word starts with the same sound) or rhyming (where the end sound of the words are the same)
  • Make up silly sayings that involved alliteration or rhyming.
  • Encourage your child to talk in full sentences for everything, if they ask you for a drink get them to say ‘Can I have a drink please?’ and not just ‘drink’.
  • Do not let your child talk baby talk or talk to them in baby talk.
  • Make sure your child no longer uses a dummy. Children by this age should not have dummies, this can seriously affect their speech and pronounciation of words.
  • Explain words and new phrases or sentences you say to them to greater develop their understanding.
  • Allow time for you to just talk as a family, switch off the TV and just have a chat (always encouraging and praising full sentences).

 

Physical Development

Physical development is as the title suggests about how babies and young children gain control of their bodies, but it also includes how children learn about keeping themselves active and healthy and how they learn to use equipment and materials successfully and safely. Physical Development is split into two sections: Moving and Handling and Health and Self Care.  Moving and handling looks at fine and gross motor skills, this basically means hand control of things like drawing, writing, picking up things etc (fine motor skills) and body control eg. how we move around a room, how we over come obstacles and our general whole body movements (gross motor skills). Health and self care looks at how children develop the ability to care for themselves by going to the toilet independently, dressing themselves, making good food choices and knowing how to use things safely.

Here are some ideas to help develop your children’s physical development:

  • Taking your child to a range of places where they can develop their body movements, eg. the park, soft play areas, skating/ice skating.
  • To develop more hand control, let children use and play with things like chopsticks, hama beads, lego, jewellery making etc.
  • Let your child dress themselves, even if it takes a while they will get there in the end.
  • Encourage your child to eat healthy and show them the difference between healthy and unhealthy food.
  • When they are playing outside, get them to think about their moving around, not just running but skipping, hopping, galloping etc.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

Personal, social and emotional development is recognised as one of the building blocks of success in life. It supports children’s development by helping them to interact effectively and develop positive attitudes to themselves and others. PSED is split into three sections: Self- confidence and self-awareness, Managing Feelings and Behaviour and Making Relationships.

Here are some ideas to help develop your children’s personal, social and emotional development:

  • Learning to share is an important part of your child’s development, make sure you give them lots of opportunities to share, even if it is sharing something with an adult rather than a child.
  • Don’t always let them win games that you play with them, they need to learn that they do not always win things.
  • Set clear boundaries at home, with rules and expectations. Ask an adult in Reception if you would like to know what our rules and expectations are so you can carry out similar at home.
  • If your child is upset/crying about something, try to get them to talk about it and explain why they are upset, so they learn to talk things through and resolve things.
  • Make tidying up time into a game/song, to encourage children to tidy up after themselves.
  • Give children little tasks to carry out such as sweeping up the kitchen, washing their toys, putting rubbish in the bin etc, so they take ownership of something ad enjoy carrying out small tasks.

 

Literacy

In Reception the children learn to read and write using phonics as their basis.  We teach the children new phonemes (sounds) relating them to an action (Jolly Phonics) to aid their memory.  When the children have learnt their phonemes we move onto using them to help with reading and writing.  We break words down into their phonemes to write them (segment) and put phonemes together (blend) to read them.  We also learn key words through phonics, your child will have a word pot that contains these words.  It is really important that they practice reading words before writing them.

Here are some useful guides about phonics: Parent Guide to Phonics from Twinkl  Jolly Phonics Parent/Teacher Guide

The children learn how to form their letters correctly and will practice writing their full name lots in Reception.  Practicing writing their name at home using the correct letter formation will support their development.

Here are some ideas for developing reading and writing at home:

  • Sound hunt – looking for sounds in words from books, magazines, signs and labels
  • Have different types of paper (notepads, sticky-notes, characters paper) and pens to encourage your child to mark make and write
  • Talk about what your child is drawing or writing
  • Make patterns and letters in sand, shaving foam, play dough, using paint
  • Reading at home is vital, it doesn’t have to be a school book, children love to read magazines, story and information books, online stories and even labels!
  • Write cards, notes and letters to practice name writing
  • Using sponge letters in the bath or for printing with paint

The websites below all have useful games and activities as well as more information for parents.

 

Mathematics

During their time in Reception children learn to work with numbers to 20 and beyond.  We look at counting, grouping and comparing numbers as well as moving on to simple calculations.  The children will also learn to solve simple problems involving doubling, halving and sharing. The children will learn about 2D and 3D shapes, size, weight, capacity, position, distance and time developing mathematical language.  We also look at how to create and describe patterns.

Here are some ideas for developing maths skills at home:

  • Using sponge numbers in the bath or for printing with paint
  • Singing number songs and rhymes such as; ten green bottles, 5 speckled frogs and 5 little ducks
  • Finding shapes, colours and numbers in the environment (in your house, at the park, when shopping)
  • Helping with shopping, for example, counting out items and using simple coins
  • Talk about what day and month it is as well as what time it is.  Children love to wear a watch even if they cannot read the time yet.
  • Baking at home helps children to understand weight and time
  • Use positional language such as; under, over, next to and behind

 

Understanding the World

Understanding the World is about how children get to know about other people, the place where they live and about all the aspects of the environment. Understanding the world is split into three sections: People and Communities, The World and Technology.

Here are some ideas for developing understanding the world at home:

  • Visit different areas such as woods, beaches, rivers etc.
  • Allow children time to use computers and computer devices.
  • Talk to your child about their family and who is a part of it and how they are related to each other.
  • Look at flowers and plants with your child at dfferent times of the year to show them how things change.
  • Talk to your child about how things are the same or different (this can be how they are the same/different to other children).

 

Expressive Arts and Design

Expressive Arts and Design is split into two sections: Exploring and Using Media and Materials and Being Imaginative.Here are some ideas for developing expressive arts and designs at home:

 

Useful websites:

 
 

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

Beech Class

Cedar Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Reception 2020-2021

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

 

What are we learning?+

When you enter this classroom,
You are a scientist,
You are an explorer,
You are a reader,
You are a mathematician,
You are important,
You are loved,
You are a friend,
You are the REASON we’re here.

In Reception we follow The Early Years Foundation Stage Profile. The link below shows a simplistic view of what this means and what we carry out in order for our children to progress further and achieve their full potential!

 

Curriculum

Reception Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Reception Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

What is the Early Years Foundation Stage? 

 

Snow Day Activities

If for any reason our teachers and other members of staff is unable to get to Oak and Willow class due to severe weather. Please click on the link below to see what is in store for the children on what activities they will be doing.

Snow Day Activities Itinerary

How can you help?+

Communication and Language

Communicating seems to be an in-built drive- and the ways we communicate rely as much on non-verbal means as on spoken communication. Communication and language is split into three sections: Listening and Attention, Understanding and Speaking.

Here are some ideas to help deveop your children’s communication and languague:

  • Sing and teach them different songs and rhymes, particularly focusing on alliteration (when each word starts with the same sound) or rhyming (where the end sound of the words are the same)
  • Make up silly sayings that involved alliteration or rhyming.
  • Encourage your child to talk in full sentences for everything, if they ask you for a drink get them to say ‘Can I have a drink please?’ and not just ‘drink’.
  • Do not let your child talk baby talk or talk to them in baby talk.
  • Make sure your child no longer uses a dummy. Children by this age should not have dummies, this can seriously affect their speech and pronounciation of words.
  • Explain words and new phrases or sentences you say to them to greater develop their understanding.
  • Allow time for you to just talk as a family, switch off the TV and just have a chat (always encouraging and praising full sentences).

 

Physical Development

Physical development is as the title suggests about how babies and young children gain control of their bodies, but it also includes how children learn about keeping themselves active and healthy and how they learn to use equipment and materials successfully and safely. Physical Development is split into two sections: Moving and Handling and Health and Self Care.  Moving and handling looks at fine and gross motor skills, this basically means hand control of things like drawing, writing, picking up things etc (fine motor skills) and body control eg. how we move around a room, how we over come obstacles and our general whole body movements (gross motor skills). Health and self care looks at how children develop the ability to care for themselves by going to the toilet independently, dressing themselves, making good food choices and knowing how to use things safely.

Here are some ideas to help develop your children’s physical development:

  • Taking your child to a range of places where they can develop their body movements, eg. the park, soft play areas, skating/ice skating.
  • To develop more hand control, let children use and play with things like chopsticks, hama beads, lego, jewellery making etc.
  • Let your child dress themselves, even if it takes a while they will get there in the end.
  • Encourage your child to eat healthy and show them the difference between healthy and unhealthy food.
  • When they are playing outside, get them to think about their moving around, not just running but skipping, hopping, galloping etc.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

Personal, social and emotional development is recognised as one of the building blocks of success in life. It supports children’s development by helping them to interact effectively and develop positive attitudes to themselves and others. PSED is split into three sections: Self- confidence and self-awareness, Managing Feelings and Behaviour and Making Relationships.

Here are some ideas to help develop your children’s personal, social and emotional development:

  • Learning to share is an important part of your child’s development, make sure you give them lots of opportunities to share, even if it is sharing something with an adult rather than a child.
  • Don’t always let them win games that you play with them, they need to learn that they do not always win things.
  • Set clear boundaries at home, with rules and expectations. Ask an adult in Reception if you would like to know what our rules and expectations are so you can carry out similar at home.
  • If your child is upset/crying about something, try to get them to talk about it and explain why they are upset, so they learn to talk things through and resolve things.
  • Make tidying up time into a game/song, to encourage children to tidy up after themselves.
  • Give children little tasks to carry out such as sweeping up the kitchen, washing their toys, putting rubbish in the bin etc, so they take ownership of something ad enjoy carrying out small tasks.

 

Literacy

In Reception the children learn to read and write using phonics as their basis.  We teach the children new phonemes (sounds) relating them to an action (Jolly Phonics) to aid their memory.  When the children have learnt their phonemes we move onto using them to help with reading and writing.  We break words down into their phonemes to write them (segment) and put phonemes together (blend) to read them.  We also learn key words through phonics, your child will have a word pot that contains these words.  It is really important that they practice reading words before writing them.

Here are some useful guides about phonics: Parent Guide to Phonics from Twinkl  Jolly Phonics Parent/Teacher Guide

The children learn how to form their letters correctly and will practice writing their full name lots in Reception.  Practicing writing their name at home using the correct letter formation will support their development.

Here are some ideas for developing reading and writing at home:

  • Sound hunt – looking for sounds in words from books, magazines, signs and labels
  • Have different types of paper (notepads, sticky-notes, characters paper) and pens to encourage your child to mark make and write
  • Talk about what your child is drawing or writing
  • Make patterns and letters in sand, shaving foam, play dough, using paint
  • Reading at home is vital, it doesn’t have to be a school book, children love to read magazines, story and information books, online stories and even labels!
  • Write cards, notes and letters to practice name writing
  • Using sponge letters in the bath or for printing with paint

The websites below all have useful games and activities as well as more information for parents.

 

Mathematics

During their time in Reception children learn to work with numbers to 20 and beyond.  We look at counting, grouping and comparing numbers as well as moving on to simple calculations.  The children will also learn to solve simple problems involving doubling, halving and sharing. The children will learn about 2D and 3D shapes, size, weight, capacity, position, distance and time developing mathematical language.  We also look at how to create and describe patterns.

Here are some ideas for developing maths skills at home:

  • Using sponge numbers in the bath or for printing with paint
  • Singing number songs and rhymes such as; ten green bottles, 5 speckled frogs and 5 little ducks
  • Finding shapes, colours and numbers in the environment (in your house, at the park, when shopping)
  • Helping with shopping, for example, counting out items and using simple coins
  • Talk about what day and month it is as well as what time it is.  Children love to wear a watch even if they cannot read the time yet.
  • Baking at home helps children to understand weight and time
  • Use positional language such as; under, over, next to and behind

 

Understanding the World

Understanding the World is about how children get to know about other people, the place where they live and about all the aspects of the environment. Understanding the world is split into three sections: People and Communities, The World and Technology.

Here are some ideas for developing understanding the world at home:

  • Visit different areas such as woods, beaches, rivers etc.
  • Allow children time to use computers and computer devices.
  • Talk to your child about their family and who is a part of it and how they are related to each other.
  • Look at flowers and plants with your child at dfferent times of the year to show them how things change.
  • Talk to your child about how things are the same or different (this can be how they are the same/different to other children).

 

Expressive Arts and Design

Expressive Arts and Design is split into two sections: Exploring and Using Media and Materials and Being Imaginative.Here are some ideas for developing expressive arts and designs at home:

 

Useful websites:

 
 

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for t2020-2021 academic year:

 Elm Class 

Fir Class 

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 1 2020 – 2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together:

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term.

 

Year 1 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter]

Year 1 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter]

How can you help?+

There are lots of exciting ways that you can help your child at home with their key skills.  This page contains some useful ideas and website links.

READING

So that your child maintains good progress in reading, we strongly encourage regular reading activities take place at home. Children enjoy being read to and with, so please make time in your busy schedules to help your child.

* Listen to your child read as often as possible. Support them, praise great reading and help them further by asking questions about what they have read.

*  You reading to your child would be another valuable opportunity. By sharing a variety of texts and demonstrating your love of reading it will interest your child. You could also play audio stories for them to listen to or show story videos. The internet contains a selection of these e.g. Julia Donaldson Stories  and  Story Line Online . Explore youtube for more!

Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day.

Click on the link below on receiving extra support and advice on how to improve your child’s reading:

Springboard: A Parent’s Little Guide to Helping Children Read

SPELLINGS

This document has a fantastic selection of activity ideas which you can use to help engage your child with their weekly spellings. Frequent practise of the high frequency words which you recieved in the parent pack would also benefit from using these activities:

Fun spelling activity ideas!

PHONICS

This video shows how to pronounce all the sounds your child will need to know for phonics:

Sounds Video

These phonics mats show some of the sounds your child has been learning, lots of word games linked to these sounds would benefit their learning:

Phase 2 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 3 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 5 Phonics Sound Chart

Check out some of these phonics game websites by clicking on the links:


  

Youtube provides lots of additional phonics songs and videos to support the learning of different sounds and reading and writing of words for each sound.

LITERACY GAME WEBSITES

MATHS GAME WEBSITES

   

TIMESTABLES

Knowing and undertstanding how to count in 2s,5s and 10s is an important skill, therefore lots of practise and reciting of counting up in multiples would benefit your child. The 2s 5s and 10s timestables are the next hugely important skills for your child to learn.

Here are a variety of video links to support timestable development:

2 times tables videos     5 times tables videos       10 times tables videos

Plus click here for lots of fun timestable games:

        Times table games       More times table games 

Once they are confident try testing your child timestables out of order.

 

Also check out the following links for other learning websites:

Please use the login details below to get accesss to the Busy Things website:

Username: home5826

Password: peartree

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for t2020-2021 academic year:

 Elm Class 

Fir Class 

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 1 2020 – 2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together:

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term.

 

Year 1 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter]

Year 1 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter]

How can you help?+

There are lots of exciting ways that you can help your child at home with their key skills.  This page contains some useful ideas and website links.

READING

So that your child maintains good progress in reading, we strongly encourage regular reading activities take place at home. Children enjoy being read to and with, so please make time in your busy schedules to help your child.

* Listen to your child read as often as possible. Support them, praise great reading and help them further by asking questions about what they have read.

*  You reading to your child would be another valuable opportunity. By sharing a variety of texts and demonstrating your love of reading it will interest your child. You could also play audio stories for them to listen to or show story videos. The internet contains a selection of these e.g. Julia Donaldson Stories  and  Story Line Online . Explore youtube for more!

Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day.

Click on the link below on receiving extra support and advice on how to improve your child’s reading:

Springboard: A Parent’s Little Guide to Helping Children Read

SPELLINGS

This document has a fantastic selection of activity ideas which you can use to help engage your child with their weekly spellings. Frequent practise of the high frequency words which you recieved in the parent pack would also benefit from using these activities:

Fun spelling activity ideas!

PHONICS

This video shows how to pronounce all the sounds your child will need to know for phonics:

Sounds Video

These phonics mats show some of the sounds your child has been learning, lots of word games linked to these sounds would benefit their learning:

Phase 2 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 3 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 5 Phonics Sound Chart

Check out some of these phonics game websites by clicking on the links:


  

Youtube provides lots of additional phonics songs and videos to support the learning of different sounds and reading and writing of words for each sound.

LITERACY GAME WEBSITES

MATHS GAME WEBSITES

   

TIMESTABLES

Knowing and undertstanding how to count in 2s,5s and 10s is an important skill, therefore lots of practise and reciting of counting up in multiples would benefit your child. The 2s 5s and 10s timestables are the next hugely important skills for your child to learn.

Here are a variety of video links to support timestable development:

2 times tables videos     5 times tables videos       10 times tables videos

Plus click here for lots of fun timestable games:

        Times table games       More times table games 

Once they are confident try testing your child timestables out of order.

 

Also check out the following links for other learning websites:

Please use the login details below to get accesss to the Busy Things website:

Username: home5826

Password: peartree

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Hazel Class

Juniper Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 2 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 2 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Year 2 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

There are lots of exciting ways that you can help your child at home with their key skills.  This page contains some useful ideas and website links.

READING

So that your child maintains good progress in reading, we strongly encourage regular reading activities take place at home. Children enjoy being read to and with, so please make time in your busy schedules to help your child.

*  We are trying out our new book changing scheme, get involved and encourage your child to pick books from their box level which interest them.

* Listen to your child read as often as possible. Support them, praise great reading and help them further by asking questions about what they have read.

*  You reading to your child would be another valuable opportunity. By sharing a variety of texts and demonstrating your love of reading it will interest your child. You could also play audio stories for them to listen to or show story videos. The internet contains a selection of these e.g. Julia Donaldson Stories  and  Story Line Online . Explore youtube for more!

Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day.

 

SPELLINGS

This document has a fantastic selection of activity ideas which you can use to help engage your child with their weekly spellings. Frequent practise of the high frequency words which you recieved in the parent pack would also benefit from using these activities:

Fun spelling activity ideas!

PHONICS

This video shows how to pronounce all the sounds your child will need to know for phonics:

Sounds Video

These phonics mats show some of the sounds your child has been learning, lots of word games linked to these sounds would benefit their learning:

Phase 2 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 3 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 5 Phonics Sound Chart

Check out some of these phonics game websites by clicking on the links:

 

 


  

Youtube provides lots of additional phonics songs and videos to support the learning of different sounds and reading and writing of words for each sound.

 

 

LITERACY GAME WEBSITES

 

 

 

MATHS GAME WEBSITES

 

 

TIMESTABLES

Knowing and undertstanding how to count in 2s,5s and 10s is an important skill, therefore lots of practise and reciting of counting up in multiples would benefit your child. The 2s 5s and 10s timestables are the next hugely important skills for your child to learn.

Here are a variety of video links to support timestable development:

2 times tables videos     5 times tables videos       10 times tables videos

Plus click here for lots of fun timestable games:

   Times table games       More times table games 

Once they are confident try testing your child timestables out of order. 

Also check out the following links for other learning websites:

Please use the login details below to get accesss to the Busy Things website:

Username: home5826

Password: peartree

Information for Parents+

Information for parents: leaflet and video launched

The DfE have published a leaflet and short video for parents about 2019 assessments at key stages 1 and 2.

Go to:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/792059/Information_for_parents_-_2019_national_curriculum_tests_at_the_end_of_key_stages_1_and_2.pdf

Homework+

Click on the file below to see our homework grid overview for the 2020 / 2021 academic year:

Homework Grid 2020 / 2021

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Hazel Class

Juniper Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 2 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 2 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Year 2 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

There are lots of exciting ways that you can help your child at home with their key skills.  This page contains some useful ideas and website links.

READING

So that your child maintains good progress in reading, we strongly encourage regular reading activities take place at home. Children enjoy being read to and with, so please make time in your busy schedules to help your child.

*  We are trying out our new book changing scheme, get involved and encourage your child to pick books from their box level which interest them.

* Listen to your child read as often as possible. Support them, praise great reading and help them further by asking questions about what they have read.

*  You reading to your child would be another valuable opportunity. By sharing a variety of texts and demonstrating your love of reading it will interest your child. You could also play audio stories for them to listen to or show story videos. The internet contains a selection of these e.g. Julia Donaldson Stories  and  Story Line Online . Explore youtube for more!

Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day.

 

SPELLINGS

This document has a fantastic selection of activity ideas which you can use to help engage your child with their weekly spellings. Frequent practise of the high frequency words which you recieved in the parent pack would also benefit from using these activities:

Fun spelling activity ideas!

PHONICS

This video shows how to pronounce all the sounds your child will need to know for phonics:

Sounds Video

These phonics mats show some of the sounds your child has been learning, lots of word games linked to these sounds would benefit their learning:

Phase 2 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 3 Phonics Sound Chart

Phase 5 Phonics Sound Chart

Check out some of these phonics game websites by clicking on the links:

 

 


  

Youtube provides lots of additional phonics songs and videos to support the learning of different sounds and reading and writing of words for each sound.

 

 

LITERACY GAME WEBSITES

 

 

 

MATHS GAME WEBSITES

 

 

TIMESTABLES

Knowing and undertstanding how to count in 2s,5s and 10s is an important skill, therefore lots of practise and reciting of counting up in multiples would benefit your child. The 2s 5s and 10s timestables are the next hugely important skills for your child to learn.

Here are a variety of video links to support timestable development:

2 times tables videos     5 times tables videos       10 times tables videos

Plus click here for lots of fun timestable games:

   Times table games       More times table games 

Once they are confident try testing your child timestables out of order. 

Also check out the following links for other learning websites:

Please use the login details below to get accesss to the Busy Things website:

Username: home5826

Password: peartree

Information for Parents+

Information for parents: leaflet and video launched

The DfE have published a leaflet and short video for parents about 2019 assessments at key stages 1 and 2.

Go to:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/792059/Information_for_parents_-_2019_national_curriculum_tests_at_the_end_of_key_stages_1_and_2.pdf

Homework+

Click on the file below to see our homework grid overview for the 2020 / 2021 academic year:

Homework Grid 2020 / 2021

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Lavender Class

Mulberry Class 

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 3 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 3 Curriculum Autumn1 2020 Newsletter

Year 3 Curriculum Autumn2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Reading with your child is vital. Research shows that it’s the single most important thing you can do to help your child’s education. It’s best to read little and often, so try to put aside some time for it every day. Think of ways to make reading fun – you want your child to learn how pleasurable books can be. If you’re both enjoying talking about the content of a particular page, linger over it for as long as you like. Books aren’t just about reading the words on the page, they can also present new ideas and topics for you and your child to discuss. Children need to be able to confidently segment and blend the words they are reading, apply a wide range of spelling rules as well as being able to comprehend the content of what they are reading. In years 3/4 we are keen for children to read a wide variety of text and encourage them to read these in addition to their school reading books. For example, children could read magazines, e-books, comics, instruction manuals, menus, catalogues, to name a few.

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy books:

  • Encourage your child to pretend to ‘read’ a book before he or she can read words.
  • Visit the library as often as possible – take out CDs and DVDs as well as books.
  • Schedule a regular time for reading – perhaps when you get home from school or just before bed.
  • Buy dual-language books if English isn’t your family’s first language – you can talk about books and stories, and develop a love for them, in any language.
  • Look for books on topics that you know your child is interested in – maybe dragons, insects, cookery or a certain sport.
  • Make sure that children’s books are easily accessible in different rooms around your house and in different formats, such as e-books.
  • Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place.
  • The best motivation for your child to become a keen and confident reader is to have a positive role model! So, pick your favourite book up and enjoy a good read!

Children may record for themselves on some occasions. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day and have the opportunity to change their reading books every day after school in the library.

 

 

As with reading, try to make maths as much fun as possible – board games, computer games, puzzles and jigsaws are a great way to start. It’s also important to show how we use maths skills in our everyday lives and to involve your child in this. Identifying problems and solving them can also help your child develop maths skills. If you see him or her puzzling over something, talk about the problem and try to work out the solution together. Don’t shy away from maths if you didn’t like it at school. Try to find new ways to enjoy the subject with your child.

 

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy Maths:

 

  • Promote a confident attitude to Maths – encourage children to keep trying to come to a solution and explain how they got there.
  • Practice times tables as much as possible. Children in Year 3 need to be able to confidently recall the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 times tables. Year 4 children are expected to know them all by the time they leave LKS2. Regular written and verbal practice, as well as fun interactive games are very helpful in the learning of times tables. Children need to be able to mentally recall them randomly.
  • Take your child shopping and talk about the quantities of anything you buy as well as the cost of items. Encourage children to use coins to buy things, adding up the cost of multiple items, calculating change and becoming confident with money.
  • Point out the different shapes to be found around your home in and the environment.
  • Involve children in everyday activities such as baking and DIY. By allowing children the opportunity to weigh out ingredients and measure lengths and heights, this allows for children to put maths into context in the wider world.

 

http://www.ictgames.com/resources.html

 

http://www.coolmath-games.com/

 

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/

 

https://play.ttrockstars.com/ttrs/dashboard

 

 

Tips for good homework habits

 

  • Find a quiet place at home to use as a homework area. It needs a flat surface, a good light source and the right equipment eg pens, pencils, ruler, scissors, glue.
  • Be aware of modern teaching methods, eg in long division – please consult your class teacher or TA if you need support in any areas of the curriculum. Please do not teach your child methods you may have used at school as it could confuse them.
  • Plan a homework timetable and agree on when your child will do their homework.
  • Allow your child to have something nutritional to eat before starting on homework.
  • Discuss homework tasks with your child and discuss how it connects with what they are studying at school so they can see its purpose.
  • Turn off the TV.
  • Don’t give your child the answer in order to get a task finished. Instead, give prompts and
  • Don’t let homework become a chore. Keep it fun and make it a special time that you both look forward to. If parents are positive about homework, then children will also be positive.

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Lavender Class

Mulberry Class 

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 3 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 3 Curriculum Autumn1 2020 Newsletter

Year 3 Curriculum Autumn2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Reading with your child is vital. Research shows that it’s the single most important thing you can do to help your child’s education. It’s best to read little and often, so try to put aside some time for it every day. Think of ways to make reading fun – you want your child to learn how pleasurable books can be. If you’re both enjoying talking about the content of a particular page, linger over it for as long as you like. Books aren’t just about reading the words on the page, they can also present new ideas and topics for you and your child to discuss. Children need to be able to confidently segment and blend the words they are reading, apply a wide range of spelling rules as well as being able to comprehend the content of what they are reading. In years 3/4 we are keen for children to read a wide variety of text and encourage them to read these in addition to their school reading books. For example, children could read magazines, e-books, comics, instruction manuals, menus, catalogues, to name a few.

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy books:

  • Encourage your child to pretend to ‘read’ a book before he or she can read words.
  • Visit the library as often as possible – take out CDs and DVDs as well as books.
  • Schedule a regular time for reading – perhaps when you get home from school or just before bed.
  • Buy dual-language books if English isn’t your family’s first language – you can talk about books and stories, and develop a love for them, in any language.
  • Look for books on topics that you know your child is interested in – maybe dragons, insects, cookery or a certain sport.
  • Make sure that children’s books are easily accessible in different rooms around your house and in different formats, such as e-books.
  • Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place.
  • The best motivation for your child to become a keen and confident reader is to have a positive role model! So, pick your favourite book up and enjoy a good read!

Children may record for themselves on some occasions. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day and have the opportunity to change their reading books every day after school in the library.

 

 

As with reading, try to make maths as much fun as possible – board games, computer games, puzzles and jigsaws are a great way to start. It’s also important to show how we use maths skills in our everyday lives and to involve your child in this. Identifying problems and solving them can also help your child develop maths skills. If you see him or her puzzling over something, talk about the problem and try to work out the solution together. Don’t shy away from maths if you didn’t like it at school. Try to find new ways to enjoy the subject with your child.

 

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy Maths:

 

  • Promote a confident attitude to Maths – encourage children to keep trying to come to a solution and explain how they got there.
  • Practice times tables as much as possible. Children in Year 3 need to be able to confidently recall the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 times tables. Year 4 children are expected to know them all by the time they leave LKS2. Regular written and verbal practice, as well as fun interactive games are very helpful in the learning of times tables. Children need to be able to mentally recall them randomly.
  • Take your child shopping and talk about the quantities of anything you buy as well as the cost of items. Encourage children to use coins to buy things, adding up the cost of multiple items, calculating change and becoming confident with money.
  • Point out the different shapes to be found around your home in and the environment.
  • Involve children in everyday activities such as baking and DIY. By allowing children the opportunity to weigh out ingredients and measure lengths and heights, this allows for children to put maths into context in the wider world.

 

http://www.ictgames.com/resources.html

 

http://www.coolmath-games.com/

 

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/

 

https://play.ttrockstars.com/ttrs/dashboard

 

 

Tips for good homework habits

 

  • Find a quiet place at home to use as a homework area. It needs a flat surface, a good light source and the right equipment eg pens, pencils, ruler, scissors, glue.
  • Be aware of modern teaching methods, eg in long division – please consult your class teacher or TA if you need support in any areas of the curriculum. Please do not teach your child methods you may have used at school as it could confuse them.
  • Plan a homework timetable and agree on when your child will do their homework.
  • Allow your child to have something nutritional to eat before starting on homework.
  • Discuss homework tasks with your child and discuss how it connects with what they are studying at school so they can see its purpose.
  • Turn off the TV.
  • Don’t give your child the answer in order to get a task finished. Instead, give prompts and
  • Don’t let homework become a chore. Keep it fun and make it a special time that you both look forward to. If parents are positive about homework, then children will also be positive.

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the  2020-2021 academic year:

Oak Class

Pine Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 4 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 4 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Year 4 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Reading with your child is vital. Research shows that it’s the single most important thing you can do to help your child’s education. It’s best to read little and often, so try to put aside some time for it every day. Think of ways to make reading fun – you want your child to learn how pleasurable books can be. If you’re both enjoying talking about the content of a particular page, linger over it for as long as you like. Books aren’t just about reading the words on the page, they can also present new ideas and topics for you and your child to discuss. Children need to be able to confidently segment and blend the words they are reading, apply a wide range of spelling rules as well as being able to comprehend the content of what they are reading. In years 3/4 we are keen for children to read a wide variety of text and encourage them to read these in addition to their school reading books. For example, children could read magazines, e-books, comics, instruction manuals, menus, catalogues, to name a few.

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy books:

  • Encourage your child to pretend to ‘read’ a book before he or she can read words.
  • Visit the library as often as possible – take out CDs and DVDs as well as books.
  • Schedule a regular time for reading – perhaps when you get home from school or just before bed.
  • Buy dual-language books if English isn’t your family’s first language – you can talk about books and stories, and develop a love for them, in any language.
  • Look for books on topics that you know your child is interested in – maybe dragons, insects, cookery or a certain sport.
  • Make sure that children’s books are easily accessible in different rooms around your house and in different formats, such as e-books.
  • Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place.
  • The best motivation for your child to become a keen and confident reader is to have a positive role model! So, pick your favourite book up and enjoy a good read!

Children may record for themselves on some occasions. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day and have the opportunity to change their reading books every day after school in the library.

 

 

As with reading, try to make maths as much fun as possible – board games, computer games, puzzles and jigsaws are a great way to start. It’s also important to show how we use maths skills in our everyday lives and to involve your child in this. Identifying problems and solving them can also help your child develop maths skills. If you see him or her puzzling over something, talk about the problem and try to work out the solution together. Don’t shy away from maths if you didn’t like it at school. Try to find new ways to enjoy the subject with your child.

 

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy Maths:

 

  • Promote a confident attitude to Maths – encourage children to keep trying to come to a solution and explain how they got there.
  • Practice times tables as much as possible. Children in Year 3 need to be able to confidently recall the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 times tables. Year 4 children are expected to know them all by the time they leave LKS2. Regular written and verbal practice, as well as fun interactive games are very helpful in the learning of times tables. Children need to be able to mentally recall them randomly.
  • Take your child shopping and talk about the quantities of anything you buy as well as the cost of items. Encourage children to use coins to buy things, adding up the cost of multiple items, calculating change and becoming confident with money.
  • Point out the different shapes to be found around your home in and the environment.
  • Involve children in everyday activities such as baking and DIY. By allowing children the opportunity to weigh out ingredients and measure lengths and heights, this allows for children to put maths into context in the wider world.

 

http://www.ictgames.com/resources.html

 

http://www.coolmath-games.com/

 

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/

 

https://play.ttrockstars.com/ttrs/dashboard

 

 

Tips for good homework habits

 

  • Find a quiet place at home to use as a homework area. It needs a flat surface, a good light source and the right equipment eg pens, pencils, ruler, scissors, glue.
  • Be aware of modern teaching methods, eg in long division – please consult your class teacher or TA if you need support in any areas of the curriculum. Please do not teach your child methods you may have used at school as it could confuse them.
  • Plan a homework timetable and agree on when your child will do their homework.
  • Allow your child to have something nutritional to eat before starting on homework.
  • Discuss homework tasks with your child and discuss how it connects with what they are studying at school so they can see its purpose.
  • Turn off the TV.
  • Don’t give your child the answer in order to get a task finished. Instead, give prompts and
  • Don’t let homework become a chore. Keep it fun and make it a special time that you both look forward to. If parents are positive about homework, then children will also be positive.

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the  2020-2021 academic year:

Oak Class

Pine Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 4 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 4 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Year 4 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Reading with your child is vital. Research shows that it’s the single most important thing you can do to help your child’s education. It’s best to read little and often, so try to put aside some time for it every day. Think of ways to make reading fun – you want your child to learn how pleasurable books can be. If you’re both enjoying talking about the content of a particular page, linger over it for as long as you like. Books aren’t just about reading the words on the page, they can also present new ideas and topics for you and your child to discuss. Children need to be able to confidently segment and blend the words they are reading, apply a wide range of spelling rules as well as being able to comprehend the content of what they are reading. In years 3/4 we are keen for children to read a wide variety of text and encourage them to read these in addition to their school reading books. For example, children could read magazines, e-books, comics, instruction manuals, menus, catalogues, to name a few.

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy books:

  • Encourage your child to pretend to ‘read’ a book before he or she can read words.
  • Visit the library as often as possible – take out CDs and DVDs as well as books.
  • Schedule a regular time for reading – perhaps when you get home from school or just before bed.
  • Buy dual-language books if English isn’t your family’s first language – you can talk about books and stories, and develop a love for them, in any language.
  • Look for books on topics that you know your child is interested in – maybe dragons, insects, cookery or a certain sport.
  • Make sure that children’s books are easily accessible in different rooms around your house and in different formats, such as e-books.
  • Please record in their reading diaries whenever reading at home takes place.
  • The best motivation for your child to become a keen and confident reader is to have a positive role model! So, pick your favourite book up and enjoy a good read!

Children may record for themselves on some occasions. It is important that children have their reading diaries and books at school every day and have the opportunity to change their reading books every day after school in the library.

 

 

As with reading, try to make maths as much fun as possible – board games, computer games, puzzles and jigsaws are a great way to start. It’s also important to show how we use maths skills in our everyday lives and to involve your child in this. Identifying problems and solving them can also help your child develop maths skills. If you see him or her puzzling over something, talk about the problem and try to work out the solution together. Don’t shy away from maths if you didn’t like it at school. Try to find new ways to enjoy the subject with your child.

 

 

Tips for helping your child to enjoy Maths:

 

  • Promote a confident attitude to Maths – encourage children to keep trying to come to a solution and explain how they got there.
  • Practice times tables as much as possible. Children in Year 3 need to be able to confidently recall the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 times tables. Year 4 children are expected to know them all by the time they leave LKS2. Regular written and verbal practice, as well as fun interactive games are very helpful in the learning of times tables. Children need to be able to mentally recall them randomly.
  • Take your child shopping and talk about the quantities of anything you buy as well as the cost of items. Encourage children to use coins to buy things, adding up the cost of multiple items, calculating change and becoming confident with money.
  • Point out the different shapes to be found around your home in and the environment.
  • Involve children in everyday activities such as baking and DIY. By allowing children the opportunity to weigh out ingredients and measure lengths and heights, this allows for children to put maths into context in the wider world.

 

http://www.ictgames.com/resources.html

 

http://www.coolmath-games.com/

 

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/

 

https://play.ttrockstars.com/ttrs/dashboard

 

 

Tips for good homework habits

 

  • Find a quiet place at home to use as a homework area. It needs a flat surface, a good light source and the right equipment eg pens, pencils, ruler, scissors, glue.
  • Be aware of modern teaching methods, eg in long division – please consult your class teacher or TA if you need support in any areas of the curriculum. Please do not teach your child methods you may have used at school as it could confuse them.
  • Plan a homework timetable and agree on when your child will do their homework.
  • Allow your child to have something nutritional to eat before starting on homework.
  • Discuss homework tasks with your child and discuss how it connects with what they are studying at school so they can see its purpose.
  • Turn off the TV.
  • Don’t give your child the answer in order to get a task finished. Instead, give prompts and
  • Don’t let homework become a chore. Keep it fun and make it a special time that you both look forward to. If parents are positive about homework, then children will also be positive.

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Whole School Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher of the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Redwood Class 

Sycamore Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 5 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 5 Curriculum Autumn1 2020 Newsletter

Year 5 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Mathematics

It is incredibly important that by Year 5/6, children are very fluent in their times tables. They are the key to successful calculation at this level. Having sat the MTC (Multiplication Times tables Check) in year 4, they should all be ready to apply them with ease in their maths work and in preparation for taking SATs at the end of year 6.  Multiplication tables can be practiced at home, using Times Tables Rock Stars, and this would help the children immensely in their maths sessions.

Here are some ideas to help…

Times Tables Rock Stars

Topmarks.co.uk

Timestables.co.uk

Mathschase.com

www.adamup.co.uk

www.woodlandschool.co.uk

 

Reading

It is extremely important for Year 5/6 children to read at home to increase their vocabulary and cement their reading comprehension.  All pupils have access to Bug Club which they should be reading from when at home, as well as reading from a school library book, whilst in school. Reading for pleasure is extremely important to develop fluency so the children should read regularly. A wider range of texts should be encouraged to include non-fiction works. Newspaper articles, biographies and autobiographies are all text types which will help the children to access the Year 5/6 curriculum and aid in their written work for the year. We will hear them read in school, but much of their reading practice should take place at home.

 

Spelling

The children will have regular spelling tests to check their progress and prepare them for the spelling test in SATS.  Pupils have access to Readiwriter which allows them to practise their weekly spellings, set as part of homework, in a fun way. Here are some fun ways that you can get your child spelling at home…

1) Write them in the air. When they can do it with their normal writing hand, swap to the other hand (this engages both sides of the brain).

2) Write them with your finger on your child’s back, as you say each letter. Then get them to guess what you are spelling. When they are more confident, they can write on your back.

3) Do it in small chunks. If your child is getting bored, cross or stressed, come back to it later. This means that it is best not left to the night before the test.

4) Say them over and over out loud. Encourage the child to repeat after you in a soft/loud/high/low/silly voice. The sillier the better – make them laugh!

5) Get them to teach someone else (younger brother or sister/grandparent). The more people involved in the learning, the higher status it will have.

Use as many of the above as possible. Mix and match and vary it. They include visual, audio and kinaesthetic activities. By varying the learning style, you will be engaging more areas of the child’s brain and they will be more likely to remember the words.

 

 

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year:  Saplings Class.

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Pre-School 2020-2021

 

Some helpful documents:

Readiness for school project LEAFLET 2019 

Readiness for school language project LEAFLET 2019

Readiness for school maths project LEAFLET 2019

Top Tips SRP

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

 

What Are We Learning?+

When you come to play in Pre-School

 

You will get messy

You will have lots of fun

You will explore

You will make friends

You will learn

You will laugh

You matter

 

In Pre School we follow the EYFS.  Our main focus is the prime areas, which are Personal social and emotional development, Physical development and Communication and language.

We encourage independence, self belief, respect and having an inquisitive mind.

Please name all your child’s belongs.

Please take a look at our newsletter for this term by clicking on the link below:

Reminder Snack is £1 per week.

 

You can view our curriculum newsletters throughout this year by clicking on the links below.

Pre-School Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

 

Pre-School Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

How can you help?+

How can you help?

• Please ensure your child has a change of clothes, nappies, wipes and nappy sacks in their bag.

• Please ensure your child has a bottle of water each day especially now the weather is getting warmer. Please ensure that sun cream is applied before your child comes to school. Please remember to supply a named sun hat for your child.

• Snack money is £1 a week; this contributes to a healthy snack and our cooking activities

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher of the 2020-2021 academic year:

 Redwood Class 

Sycamore Class

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group:

Welcome to Year 5 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 5 Curriculum Autumn1 2020 Newsletter

Year 5 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

How can you help?+

Mathematics

It is incredibly important that by Year 5/6, children are very fluent in their times tables. They are the key to successful calculation at this level. Having sat the MTC (Multiplication Times tables Check) in year 4, they should all be ready to apply them with ease in their maths work and in preparation for taking SATs at the end of year 6.  Multiplication tables can be practiced at home, using Times Tables Rock Stars, and this would help the children immensely in their maths sessions.

Here are some ideas to help…

Times Tables Rock Stars

Topmarks.co.uk

Timestables.co.uk

Mathschase.com

www.adamup.co.uk

www.woodlandschool.co.uk

 

Reading

It is extremely important for Year 5/6 children to read at home to increase their vocabulary and cement their reading comprehension.  All pupils have access to Bug Club which they should be reading from when at home, as well as reading from a school library book, whilst in school. Reading for pleasure is extremely important to develop fluency so the children should read regularly. A wider range of texts should be encouraged to include non-fiction works. Newspaper articles, biographies and autobiographies are all text types which will help the children to access the Year 5/6 curriculum and aid in their written work for the year. We will hear them read in school, but much of their reading practice should take place at home.

 

Spelling

The children will have regular spelling tests to check their progress and prepare them for the spelling test in SATS.  Pupils have access to Readiwriter which allows them to practise their weekly spellings, set as part of homework, in a fun way. Here are some fun ways that you can get your child spelling at home…

1) Write them in the air. When they can do it with their normal writing hand, swap to the other hand (this engages both sides of the brain).

2) Write them with your finger on your child’s back, as you say each letter. Then get them to guess what you are spelling. When they are more confident, they can write on your back.

3) Do it in small chunks. If your child is getting bored, cross or stressed, come back to it later. This means that it is best not left to the night before the test.

4) Say them over and over out loud. Encourage the child to repeat after you in a soft/loud/high/low/silly voice. The sillier the better – make them laugh!

5) Get them to teach someone else (younger brother or sister/grandparent). The more people involved in the learning, the higher status it will have.

Use as many of the above as possible. Mix and match and vary it. They include visual, audio and kinaesthetic activities. By varying the learning style, you will be engaging more areas of the child’s brain and they will be more likely to remember the words.

 

 

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Introduction+

Please open the following letter from the teacher for the 2020-2021 academic year

 Willow Class

Yew Class 

 

The attached PowerPoint will give you further information about the year group..

Welcome to year 6 2020-2021

 

Below are two activities we would like you and your child to complete together…

My Transition Passport – Add a few key details about yourself that will support us in helping you to settle in. Paper copies of the transition passport can be collected from outside the school office. 

A short letter – to be written to your new teacher about the things you have been doing at home and what you are looking forward to next year.

These can be brought into school when participating in the transition session or, alternatively, emailed to celebrations@peartreemead.essex.sch.uk

Please ensure all tasks are clearly named with first and surnames.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you all in September!

What are we learning?+

Please click on the link  below to see what we will be learning this term:

 

Year 6 Curriculum Autumn 1 2020 Newsletter

Year 6 Curriculum Autumn 2 2020 Newsletter

 

How can you help?+

Mathematics

It is incredibly important that by Year 5/6, children are very fluent in their times tables. They are the key to successful calculation at this level. Having sat the MTC (Multiplication Times tables Check) in year 4, they should all be ready to apply them with ease in their maths work and in preparation for taking SATs at the end of year 6.  Multiplication tables can be practiced at home, using Times Tables Rock Stars, and this would help the children immensely in their maths sessions.

Here are some ideas to help…

Times Tables Rock Stars

Topmarks.co.uk

Timestables.co.uk

Mathschase.com

www.adamup.co.uk

www.woodlandschool.co.uk

 

Reading

It is extremely important for Year 5/6 children to read at home to increase their vocabulary and cement their reading comprehension.  All pupils have access to Bug Club which they should be reading from when at home, as well as reading from a school library book, whilst in school. Reading for pleasure is extremely important to develop fluency so the children should read regularly. A wider range of texts should be encouraged to include non-fiction works. Newspaper articles, biographies and autobiographies are all text types which will help the children to access the Year 5/6 curriculum and aid in their written work for the year. We will hear them read in school, but much of their reading practice should take place at home.

 

Spelling

The children will have regular spelling tests to check their progress and prepare them for the spelling test in SATS.  Pupils have access to Readiwriter which allows them to practise their weekly spellings, set as part of homework, in a fun way. Here are some fun ways that you can get your child spelling at home…

1) Write them in the air. When they can do it with their normal writing hand, swap to the other hand (this engages both sides of the brain).

2) Write them with your finger on your child’s back, as you say each letter. Then get them to guess what you are spelling. When they are more confident, they can write on your back.

3) Do it in small chunks. If your child is getting bored, cross or stressed, come back to it later. This means that it is best not left to the night before the test.

4) Say them over and over out loud. Encourage the child to repeat after you in a soft/loud/high/low/silly voice. The sillier the better – make them laugh!

5) Get them to teach someone else (younger brother or sister/grandparent). The more people involved in the learning, the higher status it will have.

Use as many of the above as possible. Mix and match and vary it. They include visual, audio and kinaesthetic activities. By varying the learning style, you will be engaging more areas of the child’s brain and they will be more likely to remember the words.

 

 

Information for parents+

Information for parents: leaflet and video launched

The DfE have published a leaflet and short video for parents about 2019 assessments at key stages 1 and 2.

Go to:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/792059/Information_for_parents_-_2019_national_curriculum_tests_at_the_end_of_key_stages_1_and_2.pdf

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Letters Home

Letters

Whole School Letters

Whole School Letters